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MSDS

Material Safety Data Sheet Revision I June 31, 2011

To the attention of the Plant Manager/Safety Director



To comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Hazard Communication Standard # 29 C.F.R. 1910.1200, American Special Metals, Corp. as a distributor, is required to furnish MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS for those products which are deemed hazardous.These primary metals, when improperly handled and improperly processed, have produced cancer in laboratory animals. In normal processing of specialty steels, there has been no indication of critical health hazards.

SECTION I -- PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

A tasteless, odorless, solid metal in the form of sheet, bar, plate, tubing, strip, block, and billet. The alloy identification, or trade name, is located on all shippers, invoices, order set, and packing slips accompanying this shipment. The percentage of each hazardous ingredient is listed on the certification accompanying each shipment.

SECTION II -- HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS

COMPONENT ELEMENTS CASE NO. COMPONENT ELEMENTS CASE NO
Aluminum (AL) 7429-90-5 Manganese (Mn) 7439-96-5
Carbon (C) 7440-44-0 Molybdenum (Mo) 7439-98-7
Chromium (Cr) 7440-47-3 Nickel (Ni) 7440-02-0
Cobalt (Co) 7440-48-4 Selenium (Se) 7782-49-2
Columbium (Cb) or (Nb) 7440-03-1 Silicon (Si) 7440-21-3
Cooper (Cu) 7440-50-8 Titanium (Ti) 7440-32-6
Iron (Fe) 7439-89-6 Tungsten (W) 7440-33-7


Vanadium (V) 7440-62-2

EUROPE

Nickel EC Label No. 231-111-4
Index No. 028-002-00-7
Designation: Xn Harmful
Risk Phrases: R40 Possible risk of irreversible effects.
R43 May cause sensitization by skin contact
Cobalt EC Label No. 231-158-0
Index No. 027-001-00-9
Designation: Xn Harmful.
Risk Phrases: R42/43 May cause sensitization by inhalation and skin contact.
R53 May cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment

SECTION III -- HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

Description of hazards:

As shipped, these complex alloys in massive form have no known toxicological properties other than causing allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to the metals contained in the alloys. Nickel, Cobalt, and some forms of Chromium are known skin sensitizers. Nickel and Cobalt also are classified as suspected carcinogens (EU Category 3). Absent specific test data for the alloy, mixtures (including alloys) that contain more than 1% of a substance are classified in the same manner as that substance.

Hazardous fume or dust emissions may be released during remelting, grinding, cutting, or welding. In addition to Nickel and Cobalt, Hexavalent Chromium (a known human inhalation carcinogen - EU Category 2) may be generated during processing activities. If airborne emissions are excessive, inhalation may affect worker health. Further information is given in Section VIII - Exposure Controls / Personal Protection.

SECTION IV -- FIRST AID MEASURES

Eye contact: Flush particles from the eyes with clean water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation persists, seek medical help.
Skin contact: Wash skin with soap and water to remove any metallic particles. If a rash develops, seek medical attention.
Inhalation: Remove from exposure. If respiratory irritation persists, seek medical help.
Ingestion: If symptoms of ingestion arise, seek medical help.

SECTION V -- FIRE or EXPLOSION HAZARD

Nonflammable, however sparks from welding or grinding in user operations could ignite flammable or combustible liquids, vapors and solids.

SECTION VI -- ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

Vacuum or shovel any spilled material into a suitable container. Alloy wastes are normally collected to recover metal values.

SECTION VII -- HANDLING AND STORAGE

Under normal circumstances the materials do not produce any hazardous products and as such do not require any special precautions. However, see Section 10, "STABILITY AND REACTIVITY". The transient handling of the materials would not be expected to produce any sensitization but it is good practice to use gloves for handling. The normal precautions for handling heavy objects with possible sharp edges should also be observed.

SECTION VIII -- EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION

Respiratory Protection: Respiratory protection is necessary when exposure limits for airborne contaminants are exceeded during cutting, grinding or welding on these alloys. Use air-supplied respirator in confined spaces. In the USA, use only NIOSH-approved respirators in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134, or other nationally approved respirators. In the EU if required use protection to EN136 (full face respirators), EN140 (half mask respirators), EN149 (filtered half masks (disposable)) or other appropriate EN standard. In the rest of the world use respiratory protection to the appropriate national standard.

Ventilation: Use local exhaust ventilation when cutting, grinding or welding. Maintain exposures below published exposure limits. Confined spaces require special attention to provision of adequate ventilation and/or air-supplied respirators.

IMPORTANT

Maintain exposures below the published exposure levels. Use industrial hygiene air monitoring to ensure that your use of this material does not create exposures that exceed the recommended exposure limits. Always use exhaust ventilation in user operations such as high temperature cutting, welding and grinding. Refer to the following sources for important additional information:

In U.S.A.: 29 CFR 1910, ANSI Z49.1 , American Welding Society, OSHA, U.S. Department of Labor
In Canada: Canadian Standards Association, CAN/CSA - W17.2-M87
In UK: Current exposure limits under Health & Safety Executive EH40

SECTION IX -- PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

Physical State: Solid Specific Gravity: 8-9 gm/cc Melting Point: >1260 °C Odor: Odorless Appearance: Silver-colored metal shaped as plate, bar, wire, tube, rod, strip, sheet or some intermediate form.

Other physical and chemical properties, e.g. as described in 91/155/EEC and in the Approved Code of Practice, ref. 11 (viscosity, flash point, autoflammability, vapor pressure, solubility and partition coefficient), have no safety implications in relation to these materials.

SECTION X -- STABILITY AND REACTIVITY

These alloys are very stable and no hazardous decomposition products are formed upon exposure to water or the atmosphere. Nickel can react with carbon monoxide in reducing atmospheres to form nickel carbonyl, an extremely toxic gas.

SECTION XI -- TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

Nickel and cobalt are classified as Category 3 carcinogens. The exposure route of concern is inhalation. Hexavalent Chromium (a known human inhalation carcinogen - EU Category 2) may be generated during processing activities.

As shipped, these complex alloys in massive form have no known toxicological properties other than causing allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to the metal(s) contained in the alloys. However, user-generated dusts and fumes may on contact with the skin or eyes produce mechanical irritation. Chronic exposures coupled with sweat could cause dermatitis (skin) or conjunctivitis (eyes). Excessive inhalation of user-generated fumes from high temperature cutting, remelting or welding of these alloys may, depending on the specific features of the process used, pose a long-term health hazard. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that welding fumes are possibly carcinogenic to humans.

The ingredients of fumes and gases generated in user welding, grinding and high temperature cutting operations will depend on the base metal, electrode, flux and the specific process being used. Ingredients may include metals, metal oxides, chromates, fluorides, carbon monoxide, ozone, and oxides of nitrogen. Phosgene can be produced if chlorinated solvent vapors are present in user operations.

SECTION XII -- ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS

These alloys are not soluble in water and react only very slowly with natural environments. No special precautions are necessary.

SECTION XIII -- DISPOSAL

Alloy wastes are normally collected to recover metal values. However, if disposal is necessary, dispose of in accordance with national, federal, state or local regulations. In the UK, most alloy material would be classified as special waste.

SECTION XIV -- TRANSPORTATION

No special precautions are necessary for the transport of these materials.

SECTION XV -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

Classification and labeling requirements:

Alloys containing less than 1% of nickel or cobalt are not classified as "dangerous for supply". Alloys containing more than 1% of either metal are classified as the metals themselves (see Section II). However, in recognition of their essentially non-hazardous nature, these alloys in the massive form are not required to be labeled as hazardous.

SECTION XVI -- ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

If you have any questions o need any added information, please contact the producing mill, a professional hygienist, or a professional metalurgist. We urge you to distribute this information among the personnel processing and handling this material so that they are fully advised of any health hazards when exposed to this product.

SECTION XVII -- PREPARATION INFORMATION

Prepared by

American Special Metals, Corp.

11890 S.W. 8th Street Penthouse VII

Miami, Florida 33184

Telephone: (305) 551-4215; Fax: (305) 551-3436

E-Mail: info@AmericanSpecialMetals.com

Website: www.AmericanSpecialMetals.com

It is American Special Metals’ belief that information set forth in this Material Safety Data Sheet is Accurate. American Special Metals makes no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect thereto and disclaims any liability from reliance thereon. Users should make their own assessment of workplace risks as required by other health and safety legislation.

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